5 Things Burglars Don’t Want You to Know

Published: November 15, 2016

Updated: January 15, 2019  

by Alaina Tweddale

While my husband and I were out visiting family one weekend, thieves broke into our home, took the pillow cases off our bed, and filled them with our valuables. We didn’t know this, of course, until hours after they’d escaped, undetected, into the cool evening air.

Up until that point, I’d been naïve about home break-ins. I didn’t think one could happen to me—and for good reason. The number of U.S. burglaries has declined over the past 10 years. Yet, in 2017, there were still more than 1.4 million committed, as reported by the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Program.

Although a homeowners policy or renters policy can help defray the costs of stolen goods, for many of us, a break-in is about more than just lost stuff. For weeks after our own, I felt violated, afraid and a little angry.

What’s a homeowner to do? Turns out there are several simple steps you can take to help keep the bad guys at bay. Here’s what you should know.

When Do Most Burglars Strike?

Most burglaries are committed by careful thieves who plan crimes based on when they’re least likely to get caught. That means they’re sometimes walking the neighborhood, taking note of homes with dogs, with security systems, and with long stretches of time with no one home.

Burglars Strike During the Day

Burglars don’t want to run into people. Doing so makes their job that much more difficult, which is probably why more than half of home break-ins occur during the day, when most people are at work or at school.

Thieves are often “looking for signs that no one is there,” says Trooper Pascal DiJoseph from the Pennsylvania State Police. ‘They like the easy way. They don’t want to make noise. They don’t want to get caught.”

Of course, we can’t be home all the time. But that doesn’t mean that we can’t fool a would-be burglar into thinking that we are.

Warmer Weather Welcomes More Burglar Activity

As temperatures rise, so do burglary rates. That’s according to a 2014 research report released by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which found substantial summer spikes in crime activity over a 17-year period. The combination of lengthier days and pleasant weather means people will spend more time away from home, creating greater opportunity for the neighborhood prowler.

The best defense may be to make it appear as if someone is home, even if you aren’t. Read on to discover five easy-to-follow tips to fool would-be burglars below.

1. Locking Your Doors & Windows Can Stop One-Third of Break-Ins Many home burglaries are crimes of opportunity, according to Eric M. Gruss, a Monterey County, California-based police officer. “They’ll try the front door, the side door, the back,” says Gruss. Other common points of entry include a home’s attached garage or its first-floor windows.

“People often don’t double check to make sure their windows and doors are locked,” explains Gruss. That’s the kind of complacency thieves count on. In fact, about one in three burglars enter the home when it is unlocked.

Doors and Locks                                                                                          

Despite the high number of open-door-and-window break-ins, most burglaries do involve some sort of forcible entry. Many locks—particularly those placed on secondary doors like those on back, porch, and garage doors—aren’t strong enough to keep the bad guys out. For best protection, all exterior doors should be solid—that means no windows—and kick-proof.

Also, “there should be deadbolts on all your doors,” advises Gruss. The most effective deadbolt locks will be installed with a box strike plate—an upgrade from the standard strike plate that rests on your door jamb. The strick plate is the weakest point of the door, making it a common entry for a door-kicking burglar. For added durability, install the box strike plate using three inch screws, instead of the standard one inch.While you’re at it, protect your windows, too. Gruss suggests an auto-lock feature for those.

If you moved recently, make sure to change all the locks and update any coded entry points. A previous owner could have left an extra key or pass code with a pet sitter, adult child, or neighbor. In short, unless you change the locks, you don’t know who has access to your home.

And what about your hiding your spare key? “Never leave it on your property,” warns Gruss. “If you can think of a hiding spot, a bad guy can think of it too.” Instead, hand off a copy to a trusted neighbor.

Sliding Glass Doors                                                                                          

Large, sliding glass doors can be easy to shatter, often leaving them vulnerable to attack. They’re also “notorious for lock failure,” adds Gruss. “To be extra safe, get something like a broomstick [or a dowel] and keep it along the bottom of the door, so no one will be able to open it.”

The installation of a glass break detector can also trigger a home alarm if the sound of shattered glass is detected. Other safety options include the installation of shatterproof film or a heavy duty sliding door lock.

Windows                                                                                                                   

We all want to open some windows to let some fresh air inside, particularly when the weather turns warm. When it comes to safety, however, the window is easily shattered, making it the most fragile entry way into the home. They’re also often left unlocked or equipped with a latch, making it easier to force or pry open. That’s why the most effective ways to maintain window safety include:

•An installed secondary locking mechanism. A track lock can be installed on vinyl or aluminum windows to stop the frame from moving freely up or down. Wooden windows can be secured by pushing a bolt, nail, or dowel through a hole drilled through the bottom panel’s stile and then halfway through the upper panel’s stile.

•Close windows when you’re not home. It only takes a burglar a few minutes to break in a rob a home. Closing the windows, even for a quick trip to the store, may be the delay needed to send a prowler packing.

•Carefully select which windows to open, when you do open them. When sleeping, keep only the hard-to-reach windows—like those on the second floor, away from any flat roofing—open. It’s also best to open the windows that are visible from the street. A thief will have a harder time slipping into a window that’s easily visible to neighbors.

•Don’t open windows too wide. Even better, keep all windows open by a margin of less that four inches. Why? That’s the circumference of a child’s head, which means there’s little chance a burglar can fit his head through an opening of that size.

2. Thieves Really Do Case the Joint… but You Can Fool Them

Sometimes thieves do invest time and effort in finding the perfect victim. Don’t help them in their research.

What do you do with packaging from expensive purchases?

•Don’t leave the packaging boxes from expensive new TV or game consoles outside by the trash cans for would-be thieves to spy, warns Gruss. “That’s just advertising that you’re a good potential victim.”

•Do break down the boxes and place them inside your recycling bin, where they’ll be out of sight.

Do You Leave Doors Open When You’re Home?

•Don’t keep the doors to your home, garage, or shed open, even when you’re home. An open door gives thieves a sneak peek at what tools they may be able to use to jimmy a lock or to climb to a second story window. It also showcases your pricey stored goods like a high-end tool chest, a riding lawn mower, or circular saw. If you’ve converted your garage into a livable space, be extra wary. “Here in California, a lot of people turn their garages into man caves. Keep the garage door open, and everyone can see that you have a nice TV in there,” says Gruss.

•Do keep the door closed, and keep would-be thieves from knowing what expensive toys you have stashed away. Do You Keep Your Car Doors Locked When You’re Home?

•Don’t leave your car doors unlocked, especially if you park on the street, in the driveway, or in an unlocked garage. Any items left in the car are at risk, but there’s an even greater danger most people may not consider. “Thieves may steal the garage door opener in the middle of the night and then return to your house during the day,” explains Gruss.

•Do keep the car door locked and any remote garage door openers out of sight.

What Are You Posting on Social Media?

•Don’t publicly post photos to your social media sites. Once online, anyone can access your—or your child’s—photos, which could showcase your expensive electronics and help thieves map the layout of your home. This goes double for vacation photos, which can tip crooks off to the presence of an empty home.

•Do profiles should be set to private, warns Gruss. Carefully vet friends and contacts, making sure you’re connected only with people you actually know and trust in real life. Wait to post vacation photos until after you’ve returned home.

Are You Home?

•Don’t make it obvious that you’re not home. Would-be thieves are looking for tips to identify a homeowner’s schedule, particularly one who is not often home.

•Do throw thieves off the trail by leaving a few lights on or setting a timer to turn them on at dusk. Leave some window shades up and some shades down, so it looks like someone is home, filtering the natural light. If you’re on vacation or away for an extended time, think about hiring a house sitter or asking a neighbor to check in on the house one or two times a day. A little regular movement can be just enough of a deterrent to scare off a potential burglar.

3. Being a Good Neighbor Can Decrease Area Break-In Numbers

Getting to know your neighbors, and looking out for each other, is one of the most effective ways to deter would-be burglars in search of a neighborhood to prowl.

•Create a neighborhood watch. Criminals don’t want to be approached by nosy neighbors. An area with high foot traffic, where people know each other and watch out for unfamiliar activity, will be a lot less attractive to thieves.

•Watch your neighbor’s back. Create a network of neighbors who will watch each other’s homes while away. Bring in mail, water the lawn, bring garbage and recycling cans to and from the curb. Park in each other’s driveway so it appears as if someone is home. Any act that mimics everyday activity will give thieves an indication that its business as usual at home.

•Share key security information.Share emergency contacts, a spare key, and any security codes with a trusted neighbor or two. Agree to listen for each other’s home security sirens, particularly when you know a neighbor won’t be home.

4. They Already Know Where You Keep Your Valuables… So Do This Instead

Even if you don’t post your photos online, an experienced thief probably already knows where to go. “A lot of people keep their valuables in a jewelry box, and that’s an easy target,” says DiJoseph. “They grab it and off they go.”

He suggests keeping valuable items and family heirlooms in a household safe that is either too heavy to carry or professionally mounted to a floor or beam that can’t be removed from the home.

It’s also a good idea to keep an inventory of your most important possessions. Photograph your keepsakes. Document the models and serial numbers for big-ticket electronics and guns. Think about engraving an ID number and the name of your home state on valuable electronics. Sometimes stolen items are recovered at a later date. The more identifying information you have about an item, the more likely it is to be returned to its rightful owner.

“Unless you have that information on file, though, there’s not a lot we can do to return property to its rightful owner,” explains Gruss.

Does insurance cover your stolen valuables? Your homeowner’s policy covers up to certain limits; however, adding Valuable Items Blanket Coverage to your policy, you can rest assured this added layer of protection will provide a hassle-free and inexpensive way to protect your high-value items.

Check with your home insurance agent to make sure specific items are covered.

5. You Can Make Your Home a More Difficult Target

The harder it is for a thief to enter your home, the more likely they are to go somewhere else. Here are some effective deterrents:

Home Security

•Mount a visible camera. Many home security cameras can be set to send an alert to your smartphone if someone enters the frame. “A quick glance can tell you if it’s the gardener, the exterminator, or someone else,” says Gruss. Even a fake camera can work wonders. “Thieves are more likely to pick a place that looks like it has no security on the house,” he explains.

•Invest in a home security system. As with a camera, just the sight of an alarm system sticker can be enough to deter a would-be thief. “People sometimes don’t like the sticker, they don’t like the way it looks, but posting it really does make a difference,” affirms Gruss.

•Don’t just bluff that you have a secure home. Don’t just buy a home security sticker or decal to post in front of your house. If a burglar forces entry through your back door, and doesn’t trigger an alarm, they’ll know pretty quickly that the sticker is a sham—and that your home is unguarded.

•Set the siren for a short interval. Even with an alarm, once a burglar is in, time is of the essence. “Sometimes they’re out before the siren even goes off, sometimes within a minute or two,” says DiJoseph. “That sounds like a short amount of time, but try it. Set a watch and see if you can run through every room of your house in under a minute.” (Note: I tried it. He was right. I was able to make it through my home in under a minute.) DiJoseph suggests setting your system’s siren delay for just 10-15 seconds.

•Install motion detecting lights. Night time intruders can be deterred by a blinding spotlight, triggered by an intruder’s presence.

Other Deterrents

•Trim your hedges.“High shrubs provide cover for a prowler,” explains Gruss. Keep them cut back to below your window so a burglar can’t hide while trying to pick your lock or break your glass.

•Post a “Beware of Dog” sign, even if you don’t have a dog. Some burglars are particularly dissuaded by larger breeds. Better yet, adopt an actual dog. Just be aware of how certain breeds can affect homeowner’s insurance premiums.

•Keep a television or radio on , which can deter some burglars by leading them to assume someone is home. What To Do If You See Someone Suspicious It’s not always easy to keep your cool in the heat of the moment. It can make sense to establish an emergency plan—just in case you come across a would-be intruder at home.

•If you see a suspicious vehicle in the neighborhood, write down the license plate number or snap a photo. It may turn out an unknown visitor from down the street but it won’t hurt to have the info if it turns out to be someone up to no good.

•If a stranger knocks on your door, make sure they know you’re in the home. Be loud, even if you choose to not answer the door. More than anything, you want to make your presence known. Thieves most often prefer an empty home.

•If you choose to answer the door, do so while on the phone with a friend (or pretend you’re on the phone). This will key a burglar in to the fact that someone else will know if a break-in occurs.

•If you’re positive a break-in is in progress, call 911 and shout statements like, “I just called 911!” You want let the burglar know you’re aware of their presence and that help is on the way.

•If you come home to a burglarized home, call the police immediately. Don’t touch anything the criminal may have touched. Wait outside for the police to arrive. It’s possible a burglar may still be inside the home.

Even if you follow these tips, they aren’t guaranteed to keep your home safe from burglars. Still, the harder it is to get to your goods and the more likely they are to get caught, the less likely a thief will be to select your home. If only I had known this earlier.

Factors affecting vehicle sales, insurance and repairs

By Patricia L. Harman

March 7, 2018

PropertyCasualty360

Artificial intelligence, emerging technologies and changing consumer expectations are just some of the issues impacting auto sales, insurance and repairs according to the 2018 Crash Course study from CCC Information Services, Inc.

With 17.25 million vehicles sold in 2017, slightly down from 2016, the 2% increase in average vehicle prices to $36,113 meant it was still a strong year for manufacturers. Higher vehicle costs also means increased insurance premiums, leading insureds to opt for higher deductibles should they be involved in an accident. According to the CCC report, 19% of all collision claims had a deductible of $500 or more, although the average repair generally costs significantly more than the deductible.

Auto technology improves

Manufacturers are working towards greater “vehicle connectivity, vehicle autonomy and vehicle electrification, powered by advancements in computer power, machine learning and artificial intelligence,” said Susanna Gotsch, Crash Course author and lead analyst for CCC. “Our industry has never moved faster or been so exciting. Advances in digitization, artificial intelligence, the internet of things, and sensor and camera technology are driving dramatic changes and improvements in automotive technology.”

Connected vehicles are enabling vast amounts of information about a vehicle’s health, driving data (the vehicle and driver’s), performance, as well as vehicle-to-vehicle data to be collected by manufacturers, insurers and other parties. Some of the information can help insurers with more accurate policy underwriting.

SMA research anticipates that 70% of all auto insurers will be using telematics by 2020. The benefits include a shorter delay in filing the first notice of loss with an insurer, since crash data could conceivably be sent to the insurer, first responders (in the event of bodily injuries) and to the repairer.

Technology usage in other areas has affected policyholders’ expectations for the insurance industry. Like online retailers who provide constant updates when packages have been dispatched, are en-route and will be delivered, insurers and repairers are expected to provide similar information to policyholders about their claims. Recognizing the importance regular communication has on customer satisfaction ratings, multiple insurers are utilizing programs to provide policyholders with regular updates on their claims status.

The ups and downs of ride-sharing

As the use of ride-sharing increases, so does the number of vehicles on the road and miles driven. The Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Davis studied ride-hailing in seven U.S. cities and found a 6% drop in the use of public bus transportation and a 3% drop in light rail use.

In New York City, increased ride-sharing usage accounted for declines in the use of taxi and private car services. For business travelers, ride-sharing now accounts for 65% of the ground transportation costs according to the Center for Automotive Research, while taxis only account for 7% and car rentals for 28%. Even airports are reporting a major drop in fees from parking, car rental companies and taxis.

Auto repair costs climb while collision severity drops

The increased use of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) such as front crash prevention, blind spot detection, lane departure warnings, park assist, obstacle detection and back-over prevention is having a positive impact. While these technologies are not mandated by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) and NHTSA announced in 2016 that 20 major auto manufacturers had voluntarily committed to making front crash prevention systems standard on most models (approximately 99%) by 2020.

Studies by the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) and IIHS have found that vehicles equipped with forward collision warning systems have reduced rear-end collisions by 23%, and accidents involving vehicles with automatic emergency braking dropped by 40%. The CCC report finds that in addition to fewer accidents, these systems may also help reduce the number of incidents involving cyclists and pedestrians.

While these technologies have shown promise in reducing the number and severity of accidents, the cost to repair vehicles continues to rise. CCC said the average cost for a repair increased 2% in 2017 to $2927. Repair costs for non-comprehensive losses ran 2.3% higher in 2017 than the previous year, with costs for current model vehicles running slightly higher at 3.7%. Costs to repair vehicles that were one to three years old increased 3%.

However, there is a significant difference in repair costs depending on the age of a vehicle. Average repair costs for new vehicles compared to older ones increased from 47% to 69% over the last five years. “Dollars for replaced parts as a share of total repair costs and the average number of replaced parts per claim have increased — particularly for newer vehicles,” said Gotsch in her report.

The increased use of driver assistance technologies can help mitigate or even prevent accidents, but like cell phones and other technology, they will also change driver behaviors. For insurers, this could also mean changes in liability and the types of insurance coverage required for a vehicle. The actual repair costs, while higher, could be offset by fewer overall accidents, which would have a long-term impact on parts suppliers and repair shops as well. The changes for all are probably coming more quickly than anyone expects.

Why Your Extra-Safe Car Costs More to Insure

High-tech collision-prevention systems on cars help prevent crashes but cost a lot to repair

By Christina Rogers and Leslie Scism

April 3, 2017

The Wall Street Journal

New cars loaded with high-tech crash-prevention gear are having a perverse effect on car-insurance costs: They are soaring.

Safety features such as autonomous braking and systems to prevent drivers from drifting out of their lanes are increasingly available on vehicles rolling off assembly lines. Auto companies and third-party researchers say these features help prevent crashes and are building blocks to self-driving cars. But progress comes with a price.

Enabling the safety tech are cameras, sensors, microprocessors and other hardware whose repair costs can be more than five times that of conventional parts. And the equipment is often located in bumpers, fenders and external mirrors—the very spots that tend to get hit in a crash. Insurance companies, unwilling to shoulder all the pain, are passing some of the cost off to buyers.

Jeff Woods, a professor in Illinois, recently bought a 2017 Volkswagen Passat to replace a two-year-old model. It was loaded with so-called active safety equipment. So he wasn’t expecting his State Farm insurance policy to spike 20% to $1,200 a year.

“I was told by the car dealership all the technology would improve the cost of insurance,” Mr. Woods said. “Instead, it went up.” Volkswagen AG declined to comment on Mr. Woods’ experience but said it is “proud to offer advanced-safety technology systems on our vehicles.”

Insurance sticker shock is a blow to auto makers looking to increase adoption of high-tech safety packages, which can add thousands of dollars to the price of a new car and deliver significantly higher margins than other options.

At present, though, only a fraction of buyers opt for the technology, often known as “advanced driver assistance systems,” or ADAS. As a result, replacement parts are disproportionately expensive.

About 14% of vehicles sold in the 2016 model-year were equipped with collision-mitigation technology, according to WardsAuto.com. Some insurers estimate 25% to 50% of all vehicles on the road will have to have forward-collision prevention systems before accident rates decline enough to offset higher repair costs.

At present, it costs $166 to fix a conventional left mirror on a 2015 Mercedes-Benz ML350, according to Allstate Corp., but the repair bill balloons to $925 for that mirror with collision-avoidance technology. A tech-equipped mirror on a Lexus RX 350 is $840, more than double the $390 for a mirror without the tech.

An industry alliance representing a dozen auto manufacturers declined to comment on repair costs. Several auto makers said safety is a top priority, and while new parts are expensive at first, they tend to fall over time.

Owners of ADAS-equipped cars aren’t the only ones footing the bill. Liability insurance is on the rise, too: A driver of a more-basic car may be liable for damages in a collision with a vehicle loaded with safety gear.

Bumpers, fenders, grilles and side mirrors fitted with safety sensors often cost more to fix because of the need to recalibrate software and the limited availability of replacement parts, said Susanna Gotsch, lead analyst for CCC Information Services, which provides software to collision repair shops, insurers and the automotive industry.

State Farm in October raised Illinois insurance rates 5.9%, the largest such jump since 2003. In addition to the need to fund costly repairs of safety tech, the company is also factoring in trends such as more miles driven and distracted driving, a company spokeswoman said.

Car-crash fatalities are increasing as people spend more time on the road and attempt to multitask with smartphones while at the wheel. Miles driven by Americans rose 2.8% to a record 3.2 trillion in 2016, according to the Federal Highway Administration. That increase was far outpaced by a 6% surge in motor-vehicle deaths in the same period.

Industrywide, the average annual car-insurance premium increased 14% since 2014 to $990, according to an estimate by the Insurance Information Institute.

“Safer vehicles are more expensive to repair,” Liberty Mutual Chief Executive David Long told investors in March, explaining why the severity of claims is increasing. The Boston-based company, among the 10 largest car insurers, has been raising rates by an average annual 9% since late last year.

“We are nowhere near an inflection point,” Allstate Corp. spokesman Justin Herndon said. Even after an average 7% increase in 2016, he says “there is really no other place for premiums to go but up.”

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates more than 90% of all crashes are caused by human error.

Studies conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, a nonprofit funded by the insurance industry, show a 50% reduction in rear-end crashes by cars equipped with automatic braking.

Industry groups and regulators are pressuring auto makers to make standard features that hand over more decision-making to the car. The IIHS requires vehicles to have optional automatic-braking systems to earn its Top Safety Pick awards, and 22 auto makers have pledged to make this safety feature standard by 2022.

Car makers are trying to keep the size of claims down. Subaru Corp. locates traffic-detection gear in areas that are less exposed in common crashes, such as behind the windshield.

Some insurers are experimenting with discounts. Hartford Financial Services Group Inc. is piloting a program in a few states that offers breaks for car buyers who get features such as automatic-braking systems or adaptive headlights; Liberty Mutual also offers some discounts.

Roads need to get far safer, however, for insurance hikes to reverse. “The industry is seeing, unfortunately, the additional cost of repairs, but not yet the full benefit of their potential reduction in frequency,” says Ms. Gotsch of CCC, the software provider. “The next several years are going to be challenging.”

Why Do My Insurance Rates Keep Going Up?

Recent Trends Boost Costs for Arizona Drivers

Does it seem like driving has become more expensive in Arizona in recent years? It likely has. Since 2014, the U.S. has seen more new cars on the road, and those cars are driving more miles than in years past. The severity of traffic-related accidents has increased, and insurance claims for bodily injury have become more expensive. Together, these factors are increasing the cost of driving for just about every car owner.

More new cars: New car sales hit a new record in 2015, with just under 17.5 million vehicles sold, up 5.7 percent from 2014, according to PricewaterhouseCoopers. That’s good for the economy. And, the safety, technology and convenience features that get better every year are good for drivers. Still, new cars can be more expensive to repair or replace, and all that technology doesn’t come cheap. So, the cost of accident repairs is also increasing.

More miles driven: Encouraged by greater employment and lower gas prices, those new cars, along with the older ones, are driving more miles. Whether it’s commuters driving in to Phoenix each day, or families making the trip to San Diego, U.S. drivers drove 3.1 trillion miles in 2015, according to the Federal Highway Administration. That’s another record, and it’s also the highest number of miles driven since Americans logged 3 trillion miles in 2007, just before the recession. Of course, the more miles driven, the greater the potential for accidents and the need for repairs.

Traffic deaths increase: Any traffic fatality is one too many, but the U.S. registered a 7.2 percent increase in annual traffic-related deaths from 2014 to 2015. It was the largest increase since 1966. Half of those who died were not wearing seat belts, a third of the deaths were due to drunk drivers or speeding and at least one in 10 involved distraction. It’s also worth noting that fatalities for pedestrians, bicyclists and motorcyclists increased more in 2015 than those for auto drivers and passengers. It’s a heartbreaking trend that’s both dangerous and costly.

Medical costs rising: From 2005 to 2013, the average cost for a bodily injury liability claim rose 32.1 percent, according to the Insurance Research Council. These increasing costs have been attributed to a number of factors, including the rising severity of accidents, and the rising cost of medical care. And, they come at a time when the frequency of such claims has been declining.

Distracted driving: Although using a mobile phone while driving is restricted, if not prohibited, in many states, cell phones and texting continue to be a serious cause of accidents. We don’t know just how serious this problem is, because accident reports often don’t mention if a mobile phone use was a contributing factor.

But, cell phones have brought greater awareness to the larger category, termed “distracted driving,” activities that take the driver’s attention away from the road. Distracted driving means using a cell phone or texting while operating a car, but can also refer to eating while driving, operating your car’s navigation system and conversing with passengers.

The AAA Foundation points to federal estimates that distracted driving contributes to 16 percent of the nation’s fatal crashes, about 5,000 deaths annually.

All of these rising costs and dangers impact another area of driving, too – auto insurance costs. You might see it reflected in your own premium bill, and be tempted to reduce your costs by reducing your insurance coverage. But, at a time when the risk of costly accidents is rising, it may not be wise to save money by undercutting your protection against financial loss

As an independent insurance agency, Schaller & Thomas Family Insurance is dedicated to helping you reduce your insurance costs without sacrificing the protection that gives you a feeling of security. We know where to find discounts that can benefit you. That could mean a better rate for cars with safety equipment such as anti-lock brakes (ABS) or anti-theft devices, or discounts for families who put less mileage on their vehicles or insure more than one car on the same policy. We can help you save money without sacrificing your security. Call our office today at (623)580-8688.